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1 edition of Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage found in the catalog.

Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage

Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage

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Published by Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Technical Information Service in Chicago, Ill, [Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pesticides -- Environmental aspects -- United States,
  • No-tillage -- Environmental aspects -- United States,
  • Runoff -- Environmental aspects -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesEffects of no till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage
    Statementby Terry J. Logan ... [et al.]
    ContributionsLogan, Terry J, United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Great Lakes National Program Office
    The Physical Object
    Pagination90 p. :
    Number of Pages90
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14434998M

    Tillage and herbicide incorporation effects on residue cover, runoff, erosion, and herbicide loss Article in Soil and Tillage Research 60(1) June with 30 .   Allow for harvesting on otherwise muddy days in the fall. Each of these factors contribute to the positive effect on yield. You will find all kinds of yield response estimates, but even the lowest ones make tile drainage worth considering. A plastic pipe trade association estimates a yield gain of 15% to 42%.Author: Shawn Williamson.

      Agricultural runoff flows into the lakes and rivers that hundreds of towns draw their water from. For example, herbicide runoff from a farm in Centralia, Mo., might end up in Goodwater Creek. Samples of runoff water were analyzed for pesticides at 0 to 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after pesticide application. As expected, very little runoff occurred from turf, though runoff from concrete occurred over 80 percent of the time following any rainfall or irrigation.

      One exception is that ridge-till and no-till practices can be used to increase the amount of crop residue left on the soil surface. This influences rainfall partitioning between surface runoff and subsurface drainage, which can increase agrichemical movement with subsurface drainage as surface runoff would be decreased. To avoid contamination of nearby waterways, no-tillers should not apply liquid manure to their fields when a tile line is flowing, according to a USDA researcher. Martin Shipitalo also cautions no-tillers to limit applications of liquid manure to 10, to 15, gallons per acre, injected at a depth of no more than 8 inches. “And be ready to make a dam if there is flow from a tile,” he .


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Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage Download PDF EPUB FB2

In order to address these questions, a study was initiated in on the long-term runoff and tile drainage plots at Hoytville, Ohio to determine the effects of no-till and fall moldboard plowing on runoff and tile drainage of alachlor, atrazine, metolachlor and metribuzin in a corn-soybean rotation.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The present study examines the effects of no-till versus fall moldboard plowing in a corn-soybean rotation on losses in surface runoff and tile drainage of four of the most widely used herbicides: atrazine, alachlor, metolachlor and metribuzin.

Effects of No-Till and Fall Plowing on Pesticide Movement in Runoff and Tile Drainage [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was introduced on December 2, by President Richard Nixon.

The agency is charged with protecting human health and the environment. Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage: By Ralph G. Christensen, Terry J.

Logan, Ohio State University. Dept. Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage / Mode of access: Internet Topics: Runoff, No-tillage, Pesticides. Publisher: Chicago, Ill.: Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency ; [Springfield, VA: National Technical Information Service. A four-year (–) field study in NW Ohio on a poorly drained, fine-textured soil (Mollic Ochraqualf) examined the effect of tillage (no-till versus fall moldboard plow) and crop type (maize, Zea mays, and soybean, Glycine max) on runoff and tile drainage losses of NO 3 -N and four commonly used herbicides (atrazine and alachlor on maize, Cited by: The results of studies of no-till effects on runoff and pesticide loss may be strongly affected by the length of time plots have been maintained without tillage, allowing establishment of macropores and changes in soil structure.

Global agricultural intensification has led to increased pesticide use (fold from to ) and soil erosion (14% since ). Conservation tillage, including no-till (NT), has been proposed as an alternative to conventional plow till (PT) to mitigate soil erosion, but past studies have reported mixed results on the effect of conservation tillage on pesticide by: 6.

second drainage was cropped in a 4-year no-till rotation: winter wheat-chemical fallow-winter wheat-chickpea. We recorded 13 runoff events from the inversion tillage drainage and 3 from the no-till drainage.

Runoff totaled inch and erosion tons/acre from inversion tillage, versus inch and tons/acre from no-till. Simulating Pesticide Runoff, the Effects of Aldicarb.

by Alexandra Foley. August 8, When pesticides are used in crops to control pests, their effects on the environment continue even after they have served their purpose. Pesticides can leach into the soil and water sources that both humans and animals depend on, spreading harmful. New study shows no-till is not effective in limiting pesticide movement No-till farming with GM herbicide-tolerant crops, in which herbicides are used to control weeds instead of ploughing, is constantly hyped for its supposed environmental benefits – which, however, are dubious at best and completely invalid at worst.

Now a new study (abstract below) has found. Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage. Chicago, Ill.: Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency ; [Springfield, VA]: [National Technical Information Service], []. The OpusCZ modiϐication of the Opus model for simulating pesticide runoff from California agricultural Fields Roger Smith, Ph.D. P.E. Hydraulic Engineer & Afϐiliate Professor Civil Engineering.

Additional Physical Format: Print version: Effects of no-till and fall plowing on pesticide movement in runoff and tile drainage. [Chicago, Ill.]:. Average runoff herbicide concentrations during rainfall event 1.

runoff losses of pesticides (such as herbicides) would decline exponentially with time in each runoff event. Mean glyphosate concentration in runoff was about 20% of the glyphosate MCL of mgL 1, while atrazine consistently exceeded its MCL of 3 mgL by:   Reducing tillage intensity through the implementation of conservation practices is a way to reach a more sustainable agriculture.

Reducing tillage is indeed an efficient way to control soil erosion and to decrease production costs. Nonetheless, the environmental impact of reduced tillage is not well known because conservation techniques may induce strong changes in soil Cited by: Insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides are used to kill agricultural pests.

These chemicals can enter and contaminate water through direct application, runoff, and atmospheric deposition. They can poison fish and wildlife, contaminate food sources, and destroy the habitat that animals use for protective cover.

Two tillage and two water table control treatments under continuous maize cropping were evaluated over a 3-year period (–) for their effects on evapotranspiration, surface runoff (SR), tile drainage (TD) and soil water content in the root-zone on a clay loam soil in southern by: Effect of tillage and water table control on evapotranspiration, surface runoff, tile drainage and soil water content under maize on a clay loam soil.

Ridge, Moldboard, Chisel, and No-Till Effects on Tile Water Quality. beneath Two Cropping Systems. Abstract. Soil conservation tillage systems, including ridge-tillage, often reduce surface water contamination by.

pesticides because soil erosion and surface runoff. Agricultural Runoff: New Research Trends 29 pesticide-associated agricultural runoff persist, and thus scientists are currently studying methods to minimize these risks.

One possible solLLtion to minimize agricultural runoff into streams and other water bodies involves the development of constructed wetlands to replace lost edge-of-field.Simulated tillage effects on crop production and N loss in drain flow for the second phase of study from to are shown in Fig.

4. Measured and simulated tillage effects were very similar to those in Figs. 1 and 2 for – with most data points in the 1st and 3rd quadrants; 71% for yearly N loss (Fig.Controlled drainage moderated the effects of improved subsurface drainage.

Water management did not alter the likelihood of very large (> 10 ‐ year return period) runoff events on either soil. A three‐year return period event was similated .